Alice Riordan has been studying art most of her life. She was originally a painter, influenced greatly by the beauty, sensitivity, and color of French Impressionists Renoir and Degas. While studying painting in Florence, Riordan found herself inspired by the emotion and passion of Michelangelo's sculptures.

It was not until several years later that Riordan became a sculptor herself, studying under George Gach, Angelo Bona and Margit Malmstrom. Combining the input of her teachers, Riordan's knowledge of technique and anatomy grew, as did her passion for sculpting. Over the next few years, Riordan's flair for the medium flourished. In the foundries, her sculptures began to come alive with the age-old process of bronze casting. Riordan's use of exciting variations of patinas make her talent for painting apparent.

The women that Riordan sculpts are "real." These "real women" are intensely involved in the expression, experience, or exploration of an emotion or feeling. Her works are embodied by thoughts that have been shared by women throughout time.